Tag Archives: online marketing

New Investment: Engagio

One of the most important things that we have built at FirstMark Capital is our platform and community.  It is an infrastructure that connects and empowers hundreds of employees across our portfolio companies and tens of thousands of people in the NYC ecosystem to world class content, relationships, customers and expertise.

Every journey has its start, and ours began shortly after we launched FirstMark Capital in 2008 and held our inaugural Marketing Summit.  The idea was simple: marketing was evolving rapidly, the channels through which customers and consumers engaged were changing, and those that moved to take advantage could build unfair scale ahead of others.  If we could get the best minds talking about leading technologies and their approaches, the entire portfolio could benefit.

One of the earliest speakers at our Marketing Summit was Jon Miller, the co-founder of Marketo, who evangelized a new way of thinking about customers, content, and marketing automation.  Jon and I stayed in touch over the years, becoming an advisor and friend to several of our portfolio companies.  Marketo, of course, went on to become a powerhouse in marketing automation and is a $1B+ public company today.

Fast forward 6 years and I’m delighted to announce that we are leading a $10MM Series A financing for Engagio, a new company created by Jon Miller and his co-founder Brian Babcock.  I have gotten to know Brian more recently, but he has a fantastic and very relevant background for what Engagio is doing from both the ad tech and big data worlds, having been an early engineer at successful companies like RocketFuel and Platfora.  Jon and Brian in fact worked together at Epiphany in the 90s, which was one of the early pioneers in the world of marketing software.

Engagio is at the start of its mission but is building a new software platform focused on Account Based Marketing.  Jon has written an entire post dedicated to the topic here.  Said simply, Engagio provides one place for B2B marketers to understand all the campaigns, touch points, and interactions a company has with a target customer and plan the optimal ways to engage them over time.

We are excited to be joined by many of Marketo’s prior investors, including Storm Ventures and Bruce Cleveland/Doug Pepper, alongside First Round Capital and Amplify.  Stay tuned for much, much more!

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Practical Tips from FirstMark Capital’s Online Marketing Summit

I did a post a few days ago around the high level themes from our Online Marketing Summit called “Stop Selling, Start Giving”.  There were enough very practical tactics that emerged from the event that I thought I would share some below.


  • The best time to think about SEO is when building a new site.  When using any good CMS system, such as Drupal or Joomla, be sure to use their SEO plug-in modules.  It will make it very tough to not have SEO on the site. 
  • Links are very important, particularly ratio of inbound links to outbound links.  Also, the deeper and more specific you can have links to the site (rather than just all to the homepage) that will improve the SEO of the site and pages.  Make sure your content is structured in such a way that incents people to point to deeper pages.
  • SEO is a process involving content creation, engineering head count, links, technology, and budget.  Create commitment to SEO in the organization.  Hiring one person cannot change an organization or generate real SEO value.  Consider allocating 10% of engineering time to SEO work.  The best practitioners have everyone in the organization focused and thinking about it.
  • Resources:  SEOmoz.com, Conductor.com


  • Before you spend your budget on an SEM campaign, be sure to take 10% of it FIRST and do a test run.  You can save yourself some major embarassment in case something was not set right and to further tweak. 
  • Be very careful using BroadMatch – you could spend money in a heartbeat on terms that are not related to your product or service.
  • Keyword research is critical.  Lots of tools out there can help, but also thinking about negative keywords, plural vs singular, etc, are all ways to create variation. 
  • Resources:  Clickable’s free guide SEM best practices and tips


  • Create a community and empower it to set directions – a censored community is not one at all.  Manage but “with a light touch”.   Allow users to moderate content.
  • Recognition is key for community growth – tiered structures, badges, experts, rewards (virtual or physical) are great ways to accomplish this.
  • Transparency is critical – if you have an issue, publicly engage the community and tell them what is going on.  Building trust is paramount to a vibrant community.
  • Measure the community –  post activities, engagement, session lengths, etc.   The numbers will tell you if your community is active and thriving.  If it’s not working, find out why!  It’s usually something you did.


  • Email is NOT for acquisition, it is for retention! 
  • The FROM and SUBJECT alone determine if someone opens – the questions they are asking are “DO I KNOW YOU?” AND “DO I CARE?” respectively.  Answer those questions well.
  • Build your lists organically by providing VALUE to users such that they want the information rather than a marketing message.  Use things like questions that your customer service receives as material for future newsletters.  You dont need dozens of articles – a few targeted ones that serve a purpose and give value to customers is better.
  • Create links back to specific pages on your site so you can track activity and users interests. 
  • Make sure you have a sign-up form on ALL pages of your site.  Customize the thank you note when someone does sign up – show genuine appreciation for signing up.
  • Most people have images off in their email clients – dont have a huge picture at the top or users will see a big X instead of a message in their preview screen.
  • Testing is key – treat email just like PPC.
  • Use the word “Feedback” instead of “Survey” – people are much more willing to provide feedback than take a survey.  One improves their life, another takes time from their life.

Marketing Automation

  • If you can read the “Digital Body Language” of how customers are interacting with your site, content, and marketing activities, you can calculate how likely they are to buy and where they are in sales cycle.
  • Lead scoring is critical to understand when marketing activities transition to sales type of activities.
  • Separating FIT of buyer from ENGAGEMENT of a user is critical.  A key decision maker doing a few things online and a summer intern doing a lot online should not have the same lead score.  A CEO doing A LOT is the ideal.  Segment those rigidly and pass on to sales things at the closest intersection to improve MQL close rates.

Integrated Marketing Approach – Case Study of Omniture

  • Marketing commits to generating 35-80% of sales accepted leads, and in closing 35-40% of deals in a quarter.  If you do not know what number you are responsible for, you are not strategic.
  • Dont do live webinars – record and push it out there – allow your customers to sign on when they can, fast forward to what they want, and interact as they wish.
  • It’s hard to find online marketing savvy folks.  If you cant find someone smart, hire an inexperienced, smart person and send him/her to get certifications:  DMA, AdWords, etc.  Make sure they have gone through the formal trainings – well worth the investment, and smart people without legacy biases will get this system.
  • Map your marketing process to a sales process – someone looking deep on product page is much further in a funnel than someone downloading whitepapers.   Know that and automate.
  • Sample mix of budget:  25% Site and Content, SEO 15%, SEM 15%, Email 20%, 3rd Party Emails 10%, Display Ads 5%, Newsletters 3%, Tradeshows 7%.

John Deighton’s definition of Interactive Marketing:  “The ability to address the customer, remember what the customer says and address the customer again in a way that illustrates that we remember what the customer has told us.”

Any other suggestions, please post below!!

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Stop Selling, Start Giving

FirstMark Capital yesterday hosted an Online Marketing Summit for our portfolio companies and friends in the community.  The goal was to bring together the latest thinking across a variety of functions (SEO, SEM, Email, Community, Social, Automation, and others) and to improve the overall fluency of our companies regardless of their field.  If I were to summarize everything I learned at the event, it was to “Stop Selling, Start Giving”.

The Internet has democratized customers’ abilities to learn about new products, instantly provide feedback, and share their experiences with others.  The traditional model where sales controlled the product message to buyers, carefully built relationships, and used those relationships to close deals has been permanently broken.  One way marketing strategies can now be easily sidestepped by a user that self-selects how to use products and research decisions on his or her own.  As a result, marketing’s role has changed to find buyers when they are ready to make a decision based on their OWN actions.  Steven Woods from Eloqua calls it “Digital Body Language”.  By reading the Digital Body Language, sales can step in at an appropriate and desired moment to facilitate the close of a deal at the right moment of intent.

What does it mean to “Stop Selling, Start Giving”?  By that, you should try to begin the dialogue with a customer with a value proposition and an insight that addresses a problem they have.  If they don’t have a problem, they don’t need your solution.  If they do, actively help them understand the PROBLEM better, not your PRODUCT better.  One tactic could be a whitepaper, another could be giving away your product for free initially, another could be hosting a community forum where experts comment on industry issues.  In addition, by actively participating in the customer pain and facilitating their dialogue, you gain a precious opportunity to subtly influence and learn from the dialogue.  Transparency exists whether you want it or not – embrace it!

By the act of giving, you’ll begin to engage a prospective customer in a series of activities.  Each of those activities can be measured online and used to decode where a customer is in their buying process.  Are they just exploring the web site?  What sections?  Have they downloaded a couple of specific whitepapers?  Now moved to using the product?  Asked for some help?  These data points can be mapped to a buying cycle where you can appropriately insert yourself to a sales activity.  Done well, you can tie all of these data into one continguous funnel that starts with first contact at the top and closes with a sale.  But it all starts by giving, not selling!

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Marketing is the New Sales

Many have written about the rise of highly capital efficient companies, the growth of SaaS, the penetration of technology into the SMB community, and the new requirement to deliver value to customers at the time of purchase.   Each of these strategies has radically altered the sales process.  No longer are armies of sales people sitting in customers’ offices or spending endless hours over dinner trying to forge relationships they can lean on in the sales process.  Instead, customers are “pulling” solutions they are interested in, trying them out for free early on, and selecting products that meet their needs.  If the best way to do sales is to have customers “declare” their interest, then one needs an exceptionally broad funnel to ensure productive sales activity.

As a result, marketing in this new era is undergoing a rapid transformation.  Marketing is no longer about softer concepts like brand building and trade shows; no longer simply providing the appropriate message and collateral for the sales organization; no longer sitting with industry analysts, hoping for positive coverage.  Instead, it has become a much more active, tactical, and quantitative function.  Done right, it becomes a highly integrated and critical part of the overall funnel. 

The next generation of marketing leaders will be fluent in online acquisition channels and implementing a real time, transparent, measurable system.  The areas of spend are highly fragmented: SEO, SEM, Email Marketing, Affiliate, Social Media, Community, Video, and on and on, balanced with the traditional channels of PR, magazine and trade shows.  Quantifying cost per lead, customer acquisition costs, conversion rates, and value per customer across each of these channels requires significant discipline.  Architecting follow up in a highly automated manner and driving to increasing levels of qualification becomes key.  Webinars, emails, and free trials are scalable ways to move potential customers along and require minimal touch.  Site activity, logins, and usage inform how much deeper customers are getting. 

The challenge is that many of these channels have only been around for a few years at most.  At FirstMark Capital, we are trying to support our CMOs make the transition by sharing the nuggets of best practices across our portfolio.  Luckily, via companies like Clickable, Conductor, and others, we have some of the leaders in these areas within the portfolio.  We are also organizing an annual Online Marketing Bootcamp for our portfolio companies and friends of the firm to augment organic knowledge with leading experts in the field. 

If you are one of these types of CMOs, we’d love to hear from you.  We have lots of places you can be used!  :)

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